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Associate of Occupational Science in Cosmetology, Esthetics

“Bacne” vs. the Swimsuit

Summer is just around the corner and we need to clear up a few things about bacne.  We’ve been so focused on our faces this winter and spring that we neglected our backs and now they are speaking out by breaking out.

The Skintourage is here to give you a few pointers on getting rid of and keeping away that unwanted “BACNE”.

Cleanse:  You will want a frangrance-free and anti-bacterial cleanser.  Many people over-cleanse the skin with harsh soaps and use vigorous scrubbing tools and products. The use of Alkaline-based surfactants or soaps not only rob skin of moisture, but also provide a bacteria-loving environment. This can also exacerbate the breakouts and slow down the healing process.

Tone: Spritz your back with an oil- and bacteria-controlling toner. Many bacne sufferers will try mentholated and alcohol astringents, which provide a cooling sensation, however in most cases these are SD alcohol-based, which strips the skin of lipids, causing the skin to over-produce oil. Look for alcohol-free toners in “smart trigger” packaging that allow for easy spritzing over your back.

Exfoliate gently: Many people use loofahs and brushes to try and rid the skin of back acne, which only worsens the condition. The use of such tools causes micro-lacerations in the skin, making it once again a hospitable environment for bacteria to breed and grow. A gentle fragrance-free scrub should be used instead. Lightly massage it over the area and rinse off.

Don’t squeeze and pick: Seek out the help of a licensed esthetician for  a back treatment to clear impactions, gently exfoliate and moisturize appropriately.

And here are a few sneaky ways to prevent bacne in the first place:
1. Avoid waxy hair products that may come into contact with the skin on your back.
2. Wear cotton clothing versus synthetic fibers, which can trap oil and dead cells.
3. Pillowcases should be changed at least every other day and sheets twice a week. Avoid using fabric softeners on bed linens as they may cause a breakout.
4. Avoid tanning beds. Many believe that this will speed up the healing of breakouts; however, the effects are only temporary. UV exposure increases cell production, causing more breakouts.

Associate of Occupational Science in Cosmetology, Esthetics

Eyelash Enhancements FAQ

Everyone loves the look of long curled lashes, but do you really know all the ins and outs of getting them to look that way and maintaining them? Here are some tidbits of information you might not know and answers to questions you might be afraid to ask:

  • Make sure you find out how long your lash specialist has been doing lash extensions and where they were certified. Some people assume that it’s an easy process to apply lash extensions, but if not properly trained it could become a big mess.
  • Ask about the type of lashes they are using, such as individuals, tabs, strips and the type of glue.
  • Individual lashes should be one solid lash and the glue should be surgical grade glue.
    • Tabs are a cluster or bundle of individual lashes grouped together to form a fan and the glue that is used should be an adhesive type liquid like glue.
    • Strips are a long strip of lashes applied to the lash line and the glue that is used should be sticky adhesive glue usually white or clear.
    • You should never allow your lash specialist to use surgical grade glue with the tabs or the strips. This glue is meant to keep the lashes on until they fall off naturally. If you apply this glue to the tabs or strip it will possibly pull out our lashes that aren’t ready to naturally fall out and could leave you with a hole in your lash line.
    • Your lashes fall out naturally just like the hair on your head and new hairs are growing in, so as you loose your lashes naturally you will also loose your extensions.
    • Individual lashes are applied individually to each lash and fall off naturally and will need to be refilled.
    • Refills can only be done on a client that has had a full set. Refills are filling in the holes where you have lost your natural lashes and applied to the new lashes that are growing in.
    • Can you apply individual lash extensions to the bottom lashes? Yes you can, but some lash specialist aren’t comfortable with applying them sine the eye has to stay open during the process. Just make sure your lash specialist has a very steady hand and you are not jittery.
    • How long will the process take? Depending on your lash specialist will depend on the amount of time it will take. Some take anywhere from 45 minutes to 3 hours. Refills normally can take 30 minutes to 1 ½ hours.
    • Will it hurt? You shouldn’t feel any discomfort with this process if done correctly. The only uncomfortable part is the tape that will be applied to the bottom lashes to help keep them from getting caught in the glue. Most people fall asleep.
    • Individual lashes are available in different sizes and different styles. Check with your lash specialist for what size and style will best work for you.
    • What do I use to remove my makeup? Use only oil-free makeup remover and do not pull on the lashes.
    • Can I use mascara? You can wear mascara, but only on the tips and no waterproof mascara.
    • Can I swim? Yes that is fine, but make sure you are careful and do not rub on the lashes.
    • Can I use steam or get facials? Steam isn’t good for the lashes; it can break down the glue. Facials are great, but make sure you inform your Facialist that you are wearing lash extensions. Hot showers need to be avoided, but if you want to continue taking them make sure you keep the door open and avoid the water on your lashes.
Associate of Occupational Science in Cosmetology, Nail Technician

Toe Nibbles

What is a fish pedicure?

A fish pedicure, also known as a fish spa, involves patrons dipping their feet in a tub of water filled with small fish called Garra rufaGarra rufa are sometimes referred to as “doctor fish” because they eat away dead skin found on peoples’ feet, leaving newer skin exposed. This is not a traditional pedicure in the sense that we think. No scrubs, massaging, toenail care etc… The service consists of a simple tank or basin with about 100 fish inside that the client places their feet into. Prices are usually around $35 for about a 15 min. session. Not to relaxing if you ask me.

Garra rufa are native to the Middle East, where they have been used as a medical treatment for individuals with skin diseases, like psoriasis. One study has illustrated the effectiveness of fish pedicures in the treatment of psoriasis; however, this treatment was performed in a controlled setting at a medical university in Austria, not at a nail salon . CDC is not aware of any published reports on illnesses resulting from fish pedicures. Nail salon foot baths, however, have caused outbreaks of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections that left infected pedicure customers with boils and scars.

Why have some states banned the use of fish pedicures?

An entrepreneur named John Ho has been credited with bringing the trend to his salon in Virginia called Yvonne’s Day Spa. He said he wanted to come up with something unique while finding a replacement for pedicures that use razors to scrape off dead skin. The razors have fallen out of favor with state regulators because of concerns about whether they’re sanitary. There are also franchise salons available in Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, as well as Virginia.

Each state has the authority to ban fish pedicures. At least 14 states, including Texas, Oklahoma and Florida, have outlawed  them. Virginia doesn’t see a problem. Plus, they have no jurisdiction over skin, unless it’s a face. Ohio permitted the fish pedicures after a review of the regulation and service details.

Most of the bans are based on at least one of the following reasons:

  • The fish pedicure tubs cannot be sufficiently cleaned between customers when the fish are present.
  • The fish themselves cannot be disinfected or sanitized between customers. Due to the cost of the fish, salon owners are likely to use the same fish multiple times with different customers, which increases the risk of spreading infection.
  • Chinese Chinchin, another species of fish that is often mislabeled as Garra rufa and used in fish pedicures, grows teeth and can draw blood, increasing the risk of infection.
  • According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceGarra rufa could pose a threat to native plant and animal life if released into the wild because the fish is not native to the United States.
  • Fish pedicures do not meet the legal definition of a pedicure.
  • Regulations specifying that fish at a salon must be contained in an aquarium.
  • The fish must be starved to eat skin, they live in an environment free of a food source, which might be considered animal cruelty.
A special thanks to Kent Berry, Clary Sage Barista Instructor, for trying a Fish Pedicure, in Mexico, and documenting the experience for us to share with everyone.
Associate of Occupational Science in Cosmetology, Cosmetology, Esthetics, Master Instructor

Makeup Trends from “The Hunger Games”

By now everyone has heard about the release of the blockbuster movie “The Hunger Games”.  What you may not realize is that movies like this set the trends we see in our makeup and hair every season. This movie has definitely inspired many of the trends we are seeing this Spring season.

For those of you that have not seen this movie or read the books, I will tell you a bit about how the movie has influenced the makeup and hair fun for this Spring.  In the movie the people that live in the Capital have amazing hair, makeup, and fashion in various bold colors. This is true for this Spring season for our makeup and hair.  Bold pops of color and bright lips or eyes are the common ways we are seeing this movie’s influence in how we wear our own makeup.

In keeping the the trends of Spring Season, the Clary Sage College Makeup Artistry students did a “Hunger Games” inspired photo shoot where they looked at characters from the movie and used them to inspire makeup and hair for their model.

Makeup and Hair by Maria Tecocoatzi, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Maria Tecocoatzi, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Ciera Horse, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Ciera Horse, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Cassandra Butler, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College.

Makeup and Hair by Cassandra Butler, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College.

Makeup and Hair by Jennifer Nelson, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Jennifer Nelson, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Stephanie Russell, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Stephanie Russell, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Girl on Fire Makeup by Cheyney Taylor, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

"Girl on Fire" Makeup by Cheyney Taylor, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Carly Migl, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Carly Migl, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Elizabeth Dodson, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Elizabeth Dodson, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Dominique Jordan, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Dominique Jordan, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Roxanne Leon, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Roxanne Leon, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Elizabeth Ashlock, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Elizabeth Ashlock, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Kade Beals, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Kade Beals, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Allena Williams, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Makeup and Hair by Allena Williams, Makeup Artistry Student at Clary Sage College

Associate of Occupational Science in Cosmetology, Cosmetology

Can You Be Addicted To Lip Balm?

By April Genshaw, Master Instructor

I’ve come across this question several times over the years, and have fully declared that I myself would attest to being addicted. At the age of 18 I lost my lip balm at a friends house one night  and actually asked  a gas station attendant if he could cover what I was short so that I could buy a new one. Now that is desperation!

Symptoms could include:
*applying heavy layers of balm before bed
*buying multiply tubes at a time; i.e. hoarding different types in your purse or car
*applying multiple times a day (something must always be covering the lip)
*having a tube in pretty much every room of your house

If any of these describe you, you aren’t alone.There is even a website www.lipbalmanonymous.com
In all seriousness there is science behind this addiction. Lets make this simple…….

Lips are Skin. Skin is complex and has layers. The top layer (stratum corneum) is mostly dead/dehydrated cells. As they die they should naturally flake away. When the cells flake away they send a signal to a deeper layer that will produce new plump cells (basal layer). This process is referred to as cellular turnover, which also slows down as you age. When you use lip balm or lip products it locks in moisture creating a barrier. The lips stay hydrated, but since not as many cells are sloughing away, the basal cell doesn’t get the signal for new cells.

Now, when the balm isn’t present, and the lips are exposed, they suddenly are dried out. The basal layer then is in overdrive trying to catch up. But then…. your lips are dry, so of course, more lip balm! The basal layers gets the “Never mind we’re fine signal” and it’s a cycle. We have trained our lips to rely on this hydrating protective barrier. Decide for yourself if you’re addicted or wanting to continue with your addiction. I personally will continue. I just love the feeling of lip balm/lipstick or lipgloss.  It just makes me Happy! We all have those double lipgloss days.

Cosmetology

Wanting To Achieve A Flawless Makeup Look? Try Primer.

What Is your Favorite Primer?

What Is your Favorite Primer?

By Emmy Downey

Makeup primer is one of those beauty secrets that can make a big difference in the look and wear of your makeup. It preps your skin for makeup and creates a smooth base that makeup can adhere well to. If you’ve tried a foundation that looks fantastic on a friend or a model in a magazine only to be disappointed with the results, using makeup primers can make a big difference. Even if you are happy with the foundation you are currently using, a layer of cosmetics primer underneath can bring it to a whole new level.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to help you learn how to apply makeup primer:

Step 1: First you will need to use moisturizer. Putting any makeup on top of dry skin usually leads to trouble later in the day. Choose a light moisturizer as heavy creams tend to make primer slide right off your skin. Be sure to let the moisturizer sit for a few minutes to allow it to be absorbed into your skin.

Step 2: Pump or pour a small amount of the primer into your hand. Dip a damp foundation wedge sponge into the primer and dab it gently onto your face, beginning under your eyes and around your nose.

Step 3: Next, add the primer to your forehead, chin, nose, and cheeks.

Step 4: Using the same sponge, blend the primer into your skin. Be sure you cover all areas as evenly as possible, but it’s okay to use a little extra in places where your makeup tends to wear off quickly, such as in the T-zone or over large pores.

Step 5: Wait a few minutes for your primer to dry before applying foundation and concealer.

Step 6: Most foundation primers aren’t suited for the eyelids, but you can purchase a primer specifically designed for the eyelid. Eyeshadow is often the first makeup to fade during the day. A good eye makeup primer can help you get much more mileage out of even the cheapest eyeshadows. Just rub some into your eyelids before applying shadow to help your shadow stick to your lids all day.

Once you know how to use makeup primer, you’ll have an extra secret weapon at your disposal to help you achieve the ultimate in your makeup look for your next special occasion.